Oil and Natural Gas Prices and the Future of Alternative Fuels

I love Vivaldi’s Four Seasons, especially the music from the spring. I love the optimistic line from the poem by P.B. Shelley, “if winter comes can spring be far behind.”  The unique cold weather, the Midwest, East Coast and even the South, has been facing this year will soon be over and spring will soon be here. Maybe it will be shorter. Perhaps, as many experts indicate, we will experience a longer summer, because of climate change. But flowers will bloom again; lovers will hold hands without gloves outside, kids will play in the park… and natural gas prices will likely come down to more normal levels than currently reflected.

Last Friday’s natural gas price according to the NY Times was $5.20 per thousand cubic feet. It was “the first time gas had crossed the symbolic $5 threshold in three and half years, although (and this is important) the current price is still roughly a third of the gas price before the 2008 financial crisis and the surge in domestic production since then.”

Why? Most experts lay the blame primarily on the weather and secondarily on low reserves, a slowdown in drilling, and pipeline inadequacies. The major impact so far has been on heating and electricity costs for many American households, particularly low and moderate income households and the shift of some power plants from natural gas back to coal.

I wouldn’t bet more than two McDonald’s sandwiches on where natural gas prices will be in the long term. But I would bet the sandwiches and perhaps a good conversation with a respected, hopefully clairvoyant, natural gas economist-one who has a track record of being reasonably accurate concerning gas prices- that come cherry blossom time in Washington, the price of natural gas will begin to fall relatively slowly and that by early summer, it will hover between 3.75 to 4.25 per thousand cubic feet.

Natural gas prices over the next decade, aided by growing consensus concerning reasonable fracking regulations as reflected in Colorado’s recent regulatory proposals, and EPA’s soon to be announced regulations, should be sufficiently high to reignite modest drilling passions, improvements in infrastructure and increased supplies at costs sufficient to maintain an advantage for natural gas based fuels when compared to oil based fuels at the pump.

The present relatively low price of oil (Bent Crude $107 a barrel; WTI $97.00 a barrel) and its derivative gasoline ($3.30 a gallon) may impact the cost differential between gasoline and natural gas based fuels. But the impact could go both ways. That is, if the price of oil per barrel continues to fall and translate into lower costs for gasoline, the price differences between natural gas based fuels and gasoline would narrow. Conversely, if the price of oil goes lower than $90 a barrel, its present price, it likely will impede future drilling, particularly in high cost, hard to get at environmentally sensitive areas. This fact combine with renewed economic growth in the U.S., Europe and Asia, as well as continued tension in the Middle East and continued speculation could well result in a return to higher gasoline prices.

Clearly, the relationship between the cost of natural gas based fuels (CNG, ethanol and methanol) and gasoline is a critical variable in determining consumer behavior with respect to conversion of existing cars to flex fuel cars and the purchase of new natural gas cars (Based on the national pilot involving 22 states lead by Governor Hickenlooper(D) and Governor Fallin(R), as well as interviews with carmakers, creation of a deep predictable market for CNG fueled vehicles will bring down the price of such cars and give them competitive status with gasoline fueled vehicles).

The odds are that the lower costs of natural gas based fuels will serve as an incentive to buyers and existing owners to use them. That is, assuming problems related to fuel distribution as well as access and misinformation concerning the affect alternative fuels have on engines are resolved by public, non-profit, academic and private sectors. Maybe I will up my bet!

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